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Southern Oregon University

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Campus Theme: Winter Term 2016 Reality

Memory, Reality and the Reality of Memory

Memories structure our identity, beliefs, thinking, and mental health: They are both our shared and private reality. Memories are also vulnerable to distractions, decay and manipulation. We forget, misremember, and, in some cases, remember events that did not even occur. This means that our experience of reality, and our ability to monitor reality through time, are linked but separate processes.  The implications for legal issues educational practices, and psychotherapy are many. This talk addresses the interface between personal and objective reality from a memory perspective.

Presenters: Dr. Mark Krause, Associate Professor of Psychology

 

Wednesday, January 20, 2016 7pm Meese Room of the Hannon Library

The Battle of Hungry Hill: A Rogue River War Battlefield Lost and Remembered

In 1855, 300 citizen militiamen and soldiers of the US Army were defeated in battle by a much smaller group of Takelma, Shasta, and Cow Creek Native Americans.  Southern Oregon University’s research led to the discovery of the battlefield, and we outlines the complex and problematic ways that the battle was recalled in pioneer memoirs, Native American oral tradition, and in historical narratives.  Given the defeat suffered at the hands of the Native Americans and that the Native forces were led by a woman—Tyee Mary—the battle did not fit well into traditional narratives of the success of Manifest Destiny and is thus useful for exploring the reality of historical story telling.

 

Presenters: Dr. Mark Tveskov, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology

Tuesday, February 16, 2016 7pm Meese Room of the Hannon Library

Religion and Reality

While belief is only one aspect of religious life it is typically the focal point of discussions about religion in American public life, which center on the truth of belief.  Since many religious beliefs are not empirically verifiable, critics of religion dismiss religious belief, generally, as unrealistic. For a sociologist of religion, however, belief itself is one of the real objects of study; that is, we can measure what people believe, and explore the origins, variability, complexity, and consequences of those beliefs. This presentation will examine, empirically, variation in belief about climate change across and within various religious traditions, thus testing the hypothesis that religion can’t accommodate scientific knowledge.

Presenter: Dr. Mark Shibley, Associate Professor Sociology and Anthropology

 

Thursday, February 25, 2016 7pm Meese Room of the Hannon Library

 

Exploring Reality

Special guest artists: Ryan Pierce and Malia Jensen are two Oregon based artists that will be in the Schneider Museum Winter exhibition. They will speak about their work and how it deals with exploring reality. 

Presenter: Ryan Pierce

A California native who works in painting, sculpture, text, and participatory journeys. He has exhibited internationally and his work has been recognized by grants from the Joan Mitchell and San Francisco Foundations. He received an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Oregon Arts Commission in 2012 and has twice been a finalist for the Northwest Contemporary Art Awards at Portland Art Museum.

www.ryanpierce.net

 

www.signalfirearts.org

Monday, February 8, 2016 5:30 pm – Messe Auditorium

 

Presenter: Malia Jensen

Jensen’s work is known to be metaphorically rife, contradictory, and, often times, perplexing sculptures. As art critic Polly Ullrich notes, “Wildness and domesticity, ‘reality’ and myth, humor and melancholy, jeopardy and sanctuary, clarity and obscurity, impropriety and elegance, mischief and tragedy, the unnerving and the darling, the conceptual and the handmade – all intermingle slyly and at many levels in Jensen’s sculpture.” Jensen has had solo exhibitions in the northwest and throughout the country.

maliajensen.com

 

Monday, March 7, 2016 3:30 pm – Messe Auditorium